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Maine is mourning the victims of the country’s deadliest mass shooting this year

LEWISTON, MAINE - OCTOBER 29: A crowd of people watch a television screen as it broadcasts from inside the Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul the remembrance ceremony on October 29, 2023 in Lewiston, Maine. The ceremony was held to remember those killed and injured when Robert Card opened fire, killing 18 people in two separate locations on October 25th. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LEWISTON, MAINE - OCTOBER 29: A crowd of people watch a television screen as it broadcasts from inside the Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul the remembrance ceremony on October 29, 2023 in Lewiston, Maine. The ceremony was held to remember those killed and injured when Robert Card opened fire, killing 18 people in two separate locations on October 25th. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Last Wednesday, a U.S. Army reservist entered a bowling alley in Lewiston, Maine,and opened fire. He then went to a bar and opened fire again.

He killed 18 people and injured at least 13 others. The youngest was 14 years old. The oldest was 76.

After a two-day manhunt and lockdown that spread over much of the southern part of the state, police say they found him dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

It was the most lethal act of firearms violence in the state’s history. Now some of the state’s representatives are changing their positions on the state’s gun laws.

We check in on Maine with Alain Stephens host of the “The Gun Machine,” a podcast produced by WBUR in partnership with The Trace.

 

Copyright 2023 WAMU 88.5

Maya Garg